Veterans Memorial Clock photos available

F ans of the Veterans Memorial Clock can now get their own copy of an iconic photograph of the clock lit up at night from the cover of the Granville Community Guide.

The image of the clock by Poultney, Vt., photographer Alan Nyiri, lit up and a wintry night with the houses on North Street shimmering in the background went out to the public as the cover of the guide for 2011. The image drew comments, compliments and interest especially for one man to whom the clock has special meaning.

When people saw it for the first time, their reaction was like that of the clock’s restorer John Freed.

“When I saw it I knew I had to have it. I was going to frame the (community guide) cover but then Luisa and Ma & Pa’s said I should try to get a hold of the photographer,” the clock’s restorer John Freed said.

Freed said Luisa also commented she liked the photo as well and posed a question to Freed: if they both wanted a copy wouldn’t others?

Freed said he went home and Googled the name in the photo credit: Alan Nyiri and immediately made contact.

“It started out that I just wanted one for myself,” Freed said.

Now, prints are being offered in three sizes and prices. “There’s one for every price point, Nyiri said.

The largest and highest quality is a numbered and signed limited edition photograph 15 inches by 18.5 inches– 21 of the set of 25 remain. No additional signed numbered prints will ever be made.

They cost $100 each. For an 11-inch by 14-inch image the cost is $25 and for the 8-inch by 10-inch image the cost is $15. Copies of the 11-inch by 14-inch print and 8-inch by 10-inch print will be reproduced per demand and are not limited to any number, the photographer said.

All prints are made with pigmented ink on archival paper, suitable for passing from generation to generation, Nyiri said.

“These should all last 100, 150, 200 years as long as they are taken care of, including the $15 print,” Nyiri said.

Proceeds from the sale of the prints will go into the maintenance fund for the clock, which is administered by the village of Granville at TD Bank.

To pick up a print go to 51 Quaker St. and the village offices or call 642-2640 or e-mail villageofgranville@roadrunner.com.

Nyiri said he got a call from Sentinel publisher John Manchester asking him to take a shot of the clock and he stopped one night to take the shots needed to create the image. “As an architectural photographer I’ve done hundreds of nighttime shots with the buildings just – the dome or building (lit up) – it’s kind of my architectural signature,” Nyiri said.

The veteran professional stopped one night and took three shots.

“When you take multiple exposures, over and under exposing and merge them with one of the software programs that are available it’s called high dynamic range imaging (HDRI). It was originally developed for movies where there are so may CGI computer graphics in images and that look you get, that hyper-realistic look like you see in Harry Potter or any of these other movies where the stonework just seems to leap at you, very three dimensional that’s the result of that,” Nyiri said.

“That,” he said indicating the photos on the table, “is really toned down; I could have made it look really crazy wild.”

As an architectural photographer, colleges such as Stanford or Cornell have paid Nyiri to use his 4 by 5 camera to shoot pictures of the campus that go into a book, which is sold out of the school’s bookstore.

To see more examples of Nyiri’s work and what HDRI photography can do check out www.alannyiri.com or www.nyiri.shutterchance.com.

It’s called HDRI or high dynamic range image and it is the method used by Poultney, Vt., photographer Alan Nyiri to capture the unique image used for the cover of the Granville Community Guide for 2011. The use of software and multiple copies of the same image (exposed to differing degrees) result in the extremely life-like quality shots produced using this process. Nyiri said he used a Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera with a 24 mm shift/tilt lens, steadying the camera with a tripod. Nyiri took three shots of the clock, exposing each to properly capture high, medium and low tones. In each image, one facet of what would become the total picture is exposed correctly and when put together the combined photos produce the effect witnessed in the clock picture as well as others the public can check out at www.alannyiri.com/ or www.nyiri.shutterchance.com

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