Rotary Club presents dictionaries to third graders

Rotary keeps up tradition with presentation to third graders

 

It’s not every day kids get excited over a book.

Granville’s third graders celebrated their return to Granville Elementary with the Granville Rotary Thursday, March 10 as the service organization continued its long-standing tradition and presented each of the students with a new dictionary.

Each spring the Rotary keeps up this tradition,  giving unique, expanded dictionaries to all of the third graders.

For educators and Rotary members alike it’s a good day, seeing children excited about a book. 

Rotary President Steve Williams and former president Patty Panza said the annual event is “near and dear” to the hearts of the Rotary members.

Panza said afterwards she really enjoyed getting to help pass out the dictionaries because the way the kids reacted gave her a good feeling.

Before passing out the books, Williams spoke briefly about what service organizations do and who the Rotary Club helps.

Principal Diane Dumas said she appreciated the club’s generosity. 

Each year for the past several years the Rotary Club has purchased special dictionaries for the entire third grade.

After a brief introduction, every student was called up to receive his own copy of “A Student’s Dictionary.”

Later Williams took the students through their paces with the new dictionaries, providing words to search for to the group assembled in the cafeteria of GES.

Students were mostly silent with their faces angled down into the books as they explored the new dictionaries looking up only occasionally to show a neighbor something they discovered within the pages.

The Rotary has been returning to the school for several years for the annual presentation.

The dictionary itself is unique.

Printed by The Dictionary Project Inc. at a greatly reduced cost to facilitate purchase by groups such as the Rotary, it contains the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and maps, as well as information on the presidents and the planets.

In 1992 Annie Plummer gave 50 dictionaries to the children in a school near her Savannah, Ga., home, to begin the program.

Since then, more than 1.25 million children have received dictionaries through the program. 

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