Scouts replace old fence

B y Jaime Thomas

Several months ago, the boy scouts of Troop 44 were looking for a good project.

When they got assigned to an old cemetery on Quaker Street during townwide cleanup day, everything fell into place.

The cemetery, which sits next to the Peniel Presbyterian Church, was bordered by a dilapidated fence that was more of an eyesore than a barrier.

“It was in really bad disrepair; it had rotting boards and holes,” said Ardyce Bresett, whose husband, Cy, is the Boy Scout Troop 44 committee chair. So scout leaders brainstormed with Town Supervisor Matt Hicks and Highway Superintendent John Tanner to come up with a plan and get the ball rolling.

“If the town could buy the materials, the boy scouts could build the fence,” Hicks said.

Together with a handful of adults, the 14 members of the troop took the old fence down at the end of June. Bresett said the wood was rotten enough that the whole task took only about two hours, including cleanup.

Tanner said it was only a matter of time until the barrier would need to be addressed.

“The fence was in pretty tough shape. It was going to have to be dealt with, if not this year, then next year,” he said.

The cemetery belongs to the town, so the town is paying for new fencing supplies; the scouts, in turn, are supplying the labor.

All the materials have been purchased and are ready to go; as soon as the group can gather again, Bresett said the troop will replace the fence. The boys will have to paint the boards before they can put them back up to create a vinyl picket fence attached to the posts that are still standing.

The finished product will be a permanent fence that should require little to no maintenance, Hicks said, and the scouts will be doing all the work.

Bresett said the boys regularly do community service as part of their membership—it’s not just those working toward becoming Eagle Scouts who take on projects.

“We like to see the scouts involved in the community,” she said. Tanner thought the idea worked out well for Granville.

“I think it’s a great project for them—it just happened by luck, and it worked out for both parties,” he said, and Hicks agreed.

“It’s a win-win all the way around. The town’s getting a new fence for a reasonable price, and the scouts are getting to do a community service,” Hicks said.

 

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